Crabs in Live Rock

Since my last tank update, I found 3 hairy rock crabs in my largest live rock. Being nocturnal, they wouldn’t disturb my clownfish during the day. But after the tank lights went out at 6:30pm every night, and as my clownfish slept on the sand bed, the crabs may have roamed about and pinched my fish.

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Saltwater Tank Update 2

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The above photo showcases the latest iteration of my saltwater display tank. After discovering the disintegration of volcanic rock on the sand bed, I replaced them with pre-cured Indonesian live rock. I purchased 2 of them for a total weight of 7.5 pounds for my 10-gallon tank. Since then, my fishes seemed much happier, cruising around the crevices of the rockwork and munching on some new algae on the rock surface. I even witnesssed the ocellaris clownfish resting on top of the larger green chromis in midwater. The last addition I made was a plug-in timer to control a daily artificial sunrise at 08:30 and sunset at 18:30.

Saltwater Tank Update 1

Less than a week after my last post, I’ve added 2 inhabitants to my tank. An ocellaris clownfish as promised, and a peaceful green chromis (about 2.5 times the clownfish’s weight).

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This fish had to be larger than the more aggressive clownfish, to hopefully even out the playing field. But 5 days ago, my colleague and I spotted the clownfish biting my green friend. They’re now separated with a purple tank divider. Below are the before and after images.

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Since I don’t have the beautiful coralline algae that all saltwater tankers crave for, I thought I’d have some artificial purple for now.

In the meantime, the clownfish will only have a smaller portion of the tank until I can think of a better cost-free solution or until the orange bully can prove that he learned his lesson.

Office Saltwater Tank

Having previously kept bettas (Siamese fighting fish) during the years 2008-2010 and 2012-2013, I’ve decided it’s about time to progress to the next level: saltwater fish. I previously housed my bettas in 1.5 gallons (5.7 liters) of dechlorinated tap water and already realized they’d need more space. This was because they often stared off into the horizon, thinking deeply.

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